Jean-Pierre Benhamou clinical state-of-the-art: Shared mechanisms in cholestatic and fatty liver disease - implications for current and future treatment

 Cholestasis and autoimmune

Main Plenary
English
State of the Art
12 April 2019 10:30 - 11:00

Michael Trauner

Michael Trauner

Medical University of Vienna
Vienna, Austria

Biography

Michael Trauner, MD, received his medical education at the Karl-Franzens-University in Graz, Austria, where he started his residency and fellowship in internal medicine in 1991. From 1994 to 1997 he was trained as an Erwin Schrödinger postdoctoral research fellow of the Austrian Science Foundation at Yale University’s Department of Internal Medicine and Liver Center in New Haven, USA, where he worked on the molecular alterations of hepatobiliary transport systems in cholestasis. After returning to Graz, he completed his training in internal medicine and a fellowship in gastroenterology and hepatology. He then established an internationally recognized research group in cholestatic and fatty liver diseases, and founded the Liver Center at the Medical University of Graz, serving as professor of experimental and clinical hepatology. Since 2010 he has been professor of gastroenterology and hepatology and chair of the Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology at the Medical University of Vienna, where he is also division head of one of the largest clinical gastroenterology, endoscopy, and liver services in Europe.

Dr. Trauner’s main research interests are the molecular mechanisms of bile acid transport and signaling in cholestatic and fatty liver diseases, the mechanisms of cell injury in cholestatic and fatty liver disease, and the development of novel pharmacologic treatments for cholestatic and fatty liver diseases. He has published more than 460 peer-reviewed scientific papers listed in Pubmed (H-index 69), 45 book chapters and has edited 3 books. He has delivered more than 250 invited lectures at international scientific meetings, mainly on molecular and clinical aspects of cholestatic and metabolic liver diseases, and holds three patents on the treatment of cholestatic and metabolic liver diseases.

Dr. Trauner is past president of the Austrian Society of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, a corresponding member of the Austrian Academy of Sciences, member of the Academia Europaea, a fellow of the American Gastroenterological Association (AGAF) and American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases (FAASLD), as well as a member of several other national and international professional and scientific societies. He has served on editorial boards and scientific committees, such as the European Association for the Study of the Liver (EASL) Governing Board and the United European Gastroenterology Council. He has also served as associate editor of Journal of Hepatology (2000 - 2009) and Hepatology (since 2009).

Talk Summary

Cholestatic and fatty liver disease share several key mechanisms of metabolic cell stress/injury (e.g. ER stress, apoptotic pathways) in hepatocytes and cholangiocytes, ultimately resuling in inflammation with activation of pro-fibrogenic and carcinogenic pathways. Changes of the gut-liver axis and gut microbiota play an important role in both disease entities. Despite different prevalences, both entities are important and rising indications for liver transplantation, reflecting our limitations in effectively preventing and treating these disorders with our currently available pharmacological options. I will discuss the role of nuclear receptors (FXR, PPARs, THRs) regulating both metabolism and inflammation, alterations in bile acid/fatty acid metabolism and signaling,  gut-liver hormonal axis (FGF-19, GLP-1), as well as microbiota, inflammation/immunity and fibrosis as common therapeutic targets for novel immunometabolic approaches shared by both disease entities. Several of these new therapeutic approaches are currently developed and tested in the treatment of both cholestatic and fatty liver disease and have shown already first promising clinical results. The mutual stimulation and crossfertilization of research in both areas can be expected to further advance our treatment options for cholestatic and fatty liver disease in the near future.


Presentations

Shared mechanisms in cholestatic and fatty liver disease - implications for current and future treatment
Michael Trauner , Austria
12 April 2019 10:30 - 11:00